Most special educators work with one or more paraprofessionals, aides or assistant teachers. Such relationships can be rewarding or disastrous, depending on how they’re structured, defined, and managed. Unfortunately, few teaching programs help their students master th...

Parents and teachers want to hear these words: “I can do it.” They’re positive. They reflect confidence, a positive assessment of ability, and a drive to accomplish something.

There are other words we want to hear from children with learning disabilities. “I will try” t...

February 2, 2008

Often, children with learning disabilities (LD) have difficulty processing language. They may understand the meaning of spoken words, yet miss the intent of the interaction. To make communications easier to understand, they often put information in discrete categories,...

February 2, 2008

Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) is an oft-used but sometimes not-so-well understood phrase in early childhood education. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC, 1996) describes DAP as teaching children in ways that (a) meet child...

February 2, 2008

In a previous column I discussed how teachers can support students during the prewriting stage of the writing process. I wrote that prewriting is often termed the “getting-ready-to-write” stage involving planning, collecting, and organizing information while considerin...

February 2, 2008

Twelve years ago, in stark terms, the American Educator underlined the importance of reading: "If a child in a modern society like ours does not learn to read, he doesn’t make it in life" (p. 3). For struggling readers, poor reading achievement is disastrous: failure t...

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